Category: "Elder Scrolls"

Damon's #BE3 Impressions!

  12:02:00 am, by Damon   , 1086 words  
Viewed 8313 times since 06/15/15
Categories: Games, Elder Scrolls, Fallout, Analysis

Ladies and Gentlemen, I've taken meticulous-ish notes  notes on the BE3 stream, and I'm SUPER psyched about the new titles being released soon! Except for one of them, but I'll get to that soon. Also, I discarded the meticulous notes, because writing notes and making detailed posts isn't how I roll. That's boring! This is incoherent fanboyism and excitement coming out however I make it come out!

The first game detailed out on the Bethesda conference was Doom. The single player gameplay is a fast-paced, deadly first person shooter with badass melee, cool weapons, and a lot of blood and gore. It looks to be a rather formulaic entry to the series, as far as first-person shooting goes. The main attraction for me, personally, is the Snapmap and the multiplayer. Snapmap is an in-game editor where the players can sculpt their own maps and challenges, alter game logic, and so forth, to create endless unique multiplayer missions, challenges, and so forth. All-in-all, though, it's not the top of my list of "must-have" games, although it is one I'd like to eventually get.

The next game they revealed information for was Battlecry, an MMO that is being released. Oceania has been involved in a beta of the game, and it's going to be opened up to a worldwide beta soon. This game is the one I am the least interested in. I'm sure Battlecry will have its own unique twist, but overall, it's largely a heavily stylised and cartoony PVP MMO, and it felt very "Team Fortress 2"-ish, in my own opinion, and I'm not terribly interested in getting the game.

Next up is Dishonored 2: The realm is being taken over by a usurper, and Corvo and a new protagonist Emily are going to be teaming up with their own unique abilities and skills to save the world. It looks quite intriguing, although I've not played Dishonored yet. (Someday I will, honest!)

While we wait for Dishonored 2, a Dishonored: Definitive Edition is being created, which is a remake of Dishonored with all of the original DLC remastered for the Xbox One and Playstation 4.

The Elder Scrolls Online stuff, I'll leave to Alarra to go on about, since she's the ESOTU guru of the lot of us, and she wants to do her own impressions post about BE3 shortly after mine.

Before I get to the biggest attraction of the release, Fallout 4, there is a spin-off TES game that Alarra will hopefully cover (because I missed it and heard only a few details as I got a drink), and there's a Fallout Shelter smartphone game. Fallout Shelter, I do know about, and it's a stereotypical micromanagement game where you build a vault, gather settlers, and blah, blah, blah. Looks cute and adorable, but I don't have a smartphone, so as these are my own impressions, I'm going to gloss over this as I'm not interested.

FALLOUT 4 COMES OUT ON NOVEMBER 10, 2015!! In Fallout 4, you make your player, a voiced male or female of a family from pre-war, and you sign up for the local Vault 111 in Boston. The player will witness the bombs go off, and though spoilers were not given, you survive the blast and two centuries later are the sole survivor of Vault 111.

The UI is beautiful, simplistic, and the game is running off a modified Creation Engine from Skyrim. At first, the thought of a rehashed Creation Engine bothered me, but when I saw what the next generation of Creation can do, it took my breath away. In Fallout 4, the player will be able to construct a settlement in this large world by dynamically creating and building buildings in real time, can draw in settlers and traders between settlements they found, and can and should build defences to protect against bandit raids. Customised weapons and armour are possible, and the player, by stripping down any item in the world, can build and customise weapons, armour, and handmade and placed buildings to an extreme degree that just makes me giddy as hell and SUPER SUPER excited!

The characters have had hundreds or thousands of popular names recorded, so whatever name you enter as your name, characters can dynamically say it and include it in conversation, for instance using the name "Howard" from the presentation. Cosworth, the family robot, would address the player by this name, as would his family, and that was absolutely incredible! It will definitely make the world feel a lot more alive and that you're definitely a part of it! The gameplay looks amazing!

The player's power armour from the trailer looks like it's a tank, with speedometers, jetpacks, badass weapons, and other cool stuff, all customisable, and it's really exciting that the game will at last feature power armour that's a mechanised warrior capable of mass damage instead of a sturdy heavy armour as has been done in the past.

The last thing I want to touch on is the pip-boy from the collector's edition of Fallout 4. It allows the player to insert their smart phone and use an app to access the pip boy i-game. According to Todd Howard's own words, it's like the other "stupid fucking gimmicks" that other people do, but his looks really cool. The one thing I'm curious about is why on earth you'd drop your controller to touch your phone on your wrist. Eh, still cool, though, and since I finally have gainful employment, I'll have to pre-order the collector's edition when I can do so. Yes, I know, people say don't pre-order, but it's a game I'd get anyway, and unlike Ubisoft, BethSoft has a good track record, and I'm a hypocrite anyway.

These are all just my random and excited thoughts on the game, and I can't wait for Fallout 4 to come out this year on the tenth of November! I'm definitely saving some money to build a gaming computer to take on this game! And Doom and any other cool ones. No way I'm playing such a game like the other console peasants, no offence to you people (okay, maybe a little offence).

I CAN'T WAIT!!! Also, here are three screenshots (in no particular order) of concept art for Fallout 4, an image of the player outside of the vault, and of Fallout Shelter, which if I haven't mentioned yet, is now available on your smartphone app stores, and was released at the end of the presentation. I wanted these images in-line with the text, but the blog always wrecks my formatting and other stuff.

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Revision History: Xbox One NA guild!

  03:18:00 pm, by   , 162 words  
Viewed 6251 times since 06/10/15
Categories: Elder Scrolls, UESP

The United Explorers of Scholarly Pursuits have begun their Xbox One expedition on the North American server! To join, send an in-game message to DarkSoup, aka Jeancey (hail, Doyen!), or leave a message on the talk page, or in the UESP guild forums.

Regarding the launch, everything finally worked out in the wee hours of the morning, after two or three hours of trying to log in. It wasn't quite the disaster some have made it out to be. But now, at least, the ESO support center message is accurate: login issues are affecting "some" players.

On behalf of North American XB1 gamers, I'm sorry, Europe. Some impatient Yankees decided to try their luck on the EU server, and basically screwed things up for the Old World, too. If it were up to me, they'd all have to live with their choice permanently or buy new copies of the game. But really, it's kind of stupid that they even had the option.

Presented Without Comment

  02:10:00 am, by   , 0 words  
Viewed 3021 times since 06/09/15
Categories: Elder Scrolls

MMO Aspects of ESO - a brief guide for new players

  10:01:00 pm, by Alarra   , 1711 words  
Viewed 2397 times since 06/08/15
Categories: Elder Scrolls

I meant to write this a while ago, back before the change to Tamriel Unlimited. The other day I was replying to a comment in an Elder Scrolls Facebook group, where someone had asked about what's different in ESO since it's an MMO, and my reply got so long, I realized that it would be much more readable - and beneficial to more people - as the blog post I had intended to write.

Note that more detailed information - especially when it comes to character creation, classes, skills, and crafting - can be found on the wiki; a great place to start is our First Time Players page, which links to a lot of the key information.

Read after the break to read the whole thing:

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The Emperor and the Nerevarine

  07:31:00 pm, by Damon   , 977 words  
Viewed 28655 times since 05/10/15
Categories: Elder Scrolls, Analysis

For those of you who haven't played Morrowind (heresy!), the premise of the game is that the Emperor personally ordered the release of a prisoner from the Imperial City's prison who appears to fulfill the Nerevarine prophecies, which speak of a reincarnation of the Dunmer war hero Indoril Nerevar, a being who will repel the attacks of Dagoth Ur, an enemy of Morrowind, see the fall of the Tribunal, who are the religious leaders and demi-gods of the Dunmer faith and nation as a whole, and possibly restore the independence of Morrowind outside of Imperial control.

The Emperor, at the start of the game, sees the prisoner, who will be the Player for the events of Morrowind, as fulfilling at least part of the Nerevarine prophecies, and after speaking with his advisors, he commands the prisoner to be shipped to Morrowind and released as a free man with orders to make contact with Caius Cosades, the head of the local Blades in the area. Through directions given to Cosades via a coded package, the player speaks to informants to learn about the Nerevarine Cult and the Sixth House, and then is initiated into the Nerevarine Cult as a prospective Nerevarine.

Ultimately, the player acquires Nerevar's Moon-and-Star, a ring cursed to kill anyone who wore it aside from Nerevar himself, thus proving that he truly is the Incarnate, then he gathers the support of the ashlanders and Great Houses by being recognised as the reborn Nerevar and Hortator (a war leader who leads the unified Great Houses in times of war), and gets the attention of Vivec himself, who recognises that the player is destined to end the Tribunal's divinity by defeating Dagoth Ur and saving Morrowind from the blight.

Now, I bring all this up, because the question I've always had is "Why?" -- Why did the Emperor research into and then start pulling the strings to fulfill an ancient prophecy related to the Dunmer? The Nerevarine Cult believes that, in addition to defeating Dagoth Ur, who is a dangerous threat to the stability of the province,  and proving the Tribunal to be false gods and dismantling the Tribunal Temple's religion, he or she will also drive the Empire out of Morrowind.

Did the Emperor just happen to be studying ancient customs and prophecies and recognise Dagoth Ur's threat to Morrowind and eventually to Tamriel as a whole and then decide that keeping Tamriel as a whole protected was worth it at the loss of control over Morrowind (looking more into the short-term)? Most of Morrowind is wrapped up in their own customs, with only the Hlaalu truly being integrated into the Empire and enthused about the relations between the Empire and the proud Dunmer people, so it could have been argued that letting go of Morrowind wouldn't be badly taken by the Dunmer people, and he'd reckon that despite initial turmoil from the Temple being destabilised, the people as a whole would thrive under a reborn Nerevar once free of the threat of Dagoth Ur's tyranny. 

Or, did he see the Nerevarine, should the prophecy be true, as a true leader of the Dunmer who could protect and lead the Dunmer people in the near to distant future and be a leader in a way that none of the Tribunes or the mortal monarch of the province could manage (more of a long-term look)? That's equally possible, because at the start of Oblivion, the Emperor tells the player that he's seen visions of his death and the coming of dark times for all of Tamriel. And, the Emperor's health had been failing around the events of Morrowind, which had resulting in the recalling of Legions to Cyrodiil and orders to recall key members of the Blades to the capital to aid in the succession, meaning that while attention was focused on the capital, the day to day affairs of the other provinces were being less scrutinised.

Without conclusive proof that visions of the Oblivion Crisis only started to happen relatively soon to the event (which happens six years after the events of Morrowind and the rise of the Nerevarine), it's entirely possible that the Emperor was acting to stabilise the province by removing internal threats and then pulling strings to unify the Great Houses and the ashlanders under one competent leader, in the event that the Emperor was incapacitated, that the succession issues lead to war, or in the event that visions of the Empire's destabilisation were true and were coming to him years before the actual event.

This long-term look at the stability of the province against many threats, rather than just the threat of Dagoth Ur alone, as I posited in my first theory, is the one I believe to be most legitimate of my two theories, based on dialogue from Caius Cosades, who says to the Nerevarine, "You're no fool. The days of the Empire are almost over. When the Emperor dies, nine hells're going to break loose. Forget about the Imperial City. Think locally. Worry about the Sixth House and Dagoth Ur. And squabbles between the Great Houses and the colonists. The rest of the political nonsense doesn't amount to a plate of scuttle." This clearly foreshadows the fall of the Empire in Oblivion and sets up that thngs will become really bad in the imminent future, and that a true leader will be needed entering the final years of the Third Era and the Fourth Era, a role that the popular Tribunal wouldn't be able to fill as their powers diminished and as Dagoth Ur grew powerful or was defeated, breaking the Tribunes and Dagoth Ur's unnatural divinity.

We might never know Uriel VII's motives for believing what many thought was an ancient superstition and sending a prisoner to change the political and religious landscape of Morrowind, but it's certainly fun to think about.